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AP - Oregon-Northwest

The Latest: I-5 to fully reopen later Wednesday after storm

ASHLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Latest on a storm that shut down a California-Oregon highway (all times local):

3:20 p.m.

The northbound lanes of Interstate 5 have reopened heading from Redding, California all the way to the Oregon border.

California transportation officials said Wednesday the freeway was clear and no chains are required.

I-5 was closed in both directions near the California-Oregon border Tuesday, stranding hundreds of people.

The southbound lanes reopened at Ashland, Oregon early Wednesday.

Don Anderson, deputy director of the California Department of Transportation in Redding, says Caltrans and many other agencies worked hard to communicate the seriousness of the storm but that many drivers were still caught by surprise.

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12:25p.m.

A California transportation official says a major highway connecting California to Oregon that was closed after cars and trucks spun out during a major storm will fully open later Wednesday.

Interstate 5 was closed in both directions near the California-Oregon border Tuesday, stranding hundreds of people. The southbound lanes reopened at Ashland, Oregon early Wednesday.

Don Anderson, deputy director of the California Department of Transportation in Redding, says northbound lanes will reopen late Wednesday afternoon.

Anderson says Caltrans and many other agencies worked hard to communicate the seriousness of the storm but that many drivers were still caught by surprise.

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9:30 a.m.

Southbound Interstate 5 has reopened after a major storm dropped snow and created blizzard conditions near the Oregon-California border.

The freeway opened around 8 a.m. Wednesday after being closed late Tuesday due to high winds and heavy snow south of Ashland.

I-5 northbound was still closed at Redding, California due to multiple stranded cars that need to be cleared.

Conditions were particularly perilous late Tuesday for drivers between Siskiyou Summit in Oregon and Redding.

Drivers reported being stuck for hours in white-out conditions and some even spent the night in their cars.

Several thousand people remained without power Wednesday morning.

The storm — called a “bomb cyclone” — came ashore near Brookings, Oregon late Tuesday afternoon packing heavy snow and winds gusting up to 106 mph (170 kmh).

The Associated Press