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Oregon-Northwest

Oregon reports 32 more COVID-19 related deaths, 437 cases — but sharp weekly declines

(Update: Adding details of 32 deaths)

17 deaths last week, fewest since last early July; cases and hospitalizations also fall significantly

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) -- There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,194, the Oregon Health Authority reported Wednesday while also issuing a promising weekly report with sharp declines in deaths, cases and hospitalizations.

Oregon Health Authority reported 437 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 154,062.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA reported that 22,406 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added Wednesday to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 14,502 doses were administered on Tuesday and 7,904 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Tuesday.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 858,481 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,133,695 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

St. Charles Health System reported 23,388 COVID-19 vaccinations given as of early Wednesday.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated Wednesday.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 162, which is three fewer than Tuesday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than Tuesday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

St. Charles Bend reported 15 COVID-19 patients as of 4 a.m. Wednesday, two of whom were in the ICU, one on a ventilator.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

OHA publishes new web tool listing vaccine providers

OHA has added a new dashboard tool showing sites verified by the Oregon Immunization Program to receive and administer COVID-19 vaccines.

Being displayed on this dashboard does not mean sites have received COVID-19 vaccine doses, are administering COVID-19 vaccines onsite or have COVID-19 vaccines in their inventory. The new dashboard tool shows progress in enrolling potential COVID-19 vaccine providers across the state.

The tool is not meant to be used for scheduling. Go to the COVID-19 vaccine webpage to learn more about vaccinations, to sign up for eligibility notifications and to find vaccination providers in your county.

Weekly COVID-19 data and outbreak reports

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released Wednesday, shows sharp decreases in daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the previous week.

OHA reported 2,260 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Feb. 15 through Sunday, Feb. 21 — a 35% decrease from last week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations fell 42%, dropping from 272 to 159.

COVID-19 related deaths also decreased from 114 to 17, which represents the lowest weekly death toll since the week of June 29–July 5.

There were 70,200 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Feb. 14 through Feb. 20, which represents a steep decline from the previous week. The percentage of positive tests was 3.5%.

People age 70 and older have accounted for 77% of deaths associated with the virus.

Wednesday’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 74 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Wednesday are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (22), Clackamas (38), Clatsop (6), Columbia (10), Coos (16), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (28), Douglas (28), Jackson (27), Jefferson (7), Josephine (20), Klamath (4), Lane (33), Lincoln (2), Linn (6), Malheur (3), Marion (33), Morrow (5), Multnomah (55), Polk (11), Sherman (1), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (15), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (41) and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 2,163rd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 6 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,164th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Jan. 30 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,165th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Feb. 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,166th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 9 and died on Jan. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,167th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 29 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,168th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 23 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,169th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,170th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 13 and died on Feb. 3 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,171st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,172nd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Feb. 23 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,173rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 24 and died on Jan. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,174th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Marion County who died on Jan. 23 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,175th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 2 and died on Jan. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,176th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive on Jan. 30 and died on Feb. 6 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,177th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 22 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,178th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Feb. 16 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,179th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on Jan. 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,180th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Feb. 5. The location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,181st COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 31 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,182nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 7 and died on Jan. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,183rd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 10 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,184th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Feb. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,185th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Dec. 31. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,186th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Jan. 24 and died on Feb. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,187th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Washington County who died on Feb. 2 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,188th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old man in Multnomah County who became symptomatic on Dec. 29 after contact with a confirmed case and died on Jan. 6 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,189th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 4 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,190th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Wasco County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Feb. 17 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,191st COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Dec. 31 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,192nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Jan. 26 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,193rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Yamhill County who died on Jan. 7 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,194th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Feb. 15 and died on Feb. 20 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit OHA's web page, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.

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Comments

10 Comments

  1. Of course the death count will continue… these people are not dying “from-because-due” to covid- they are dying of heart disease- stroke- terminal illnesses. The question is- where and how are they being infected- and why isn’t OSHA taking control of these nursing homes and hospitals where the vast number of fatalities are occurring ! Why isn’t the media demanding answers- yer killing Grandma !

  2. Because and i know that barney will dispute this bghw but the media doesnt demand answers because they see grandma has expendable and say she has lived her life expectancy. Much like cuomo will likely get off scot free. Do the counts towards the case loads for each 2 week assessment levels start on the tuesday they’re assignd or the friday they take effect. If its tuesday deschutes is already at 62 of the 200 allowed and crook will be at 14

  3. Did anyone notice that they stopped reporting covid deaths and are now saying they are covid RELATED deaths. Just shows the massive over reaction to this issue by our government also gives some validity to the theory that this was only for some other agenda. I wonder what the real numbers of COVID deaths are.

    1. As I told someone else here this week, we asked OHA – we run their releases verbatim, have since day 1, THEY made the change a few months ago and our postings reflect that – they said it was for clarity’s sake, which of course won’t satisfy some…

  4. Should have known have to divide amount of cases by 14 so we should have a way to go before we breach the 200 threshold. Throughout this whole pandemic the media has been at their worst shall we at their fearmongering worse. Pelosi was almost giddy at blaming all this on trump and now thats it on sniffles she has been rather quiet.

  5. The National Institute of Health’s grant AI23946-08 issued to Dr. Ralph Baric at the University of North Carolina at
    Chapel Hill (officially classified as affiliated with Dr. Anthony Fauci’s NIAID by at least 2003) began the work on
    synthetically altering the Coronaviridae (the coronavirus family) for the express purpose of general research, pathogenic
    enhancement, detection, manipulation, and potential therapeutic interventions targeting the same. As early as May 21,
    2000, Dr. Baric and UNC sought to patent critical sections of the coronavirus family for their commercial benefit.27 In
    one of the several papers derived from work sponsored by this grant, Dr. Baric published what he reported to be the full
    length cDNA of SARS CoV in which it was clearly stated that SAR CoV was based on a composite of DNA segments.

  6. “Using a panel of contiguous cDNAs that span the entire genome, we have assembled a full-length cDNA of
    the SARS-CoV Urbani strain, and have rescued molecularly cloned SARS viruses (infectious clone SARS-CoV)
    that contained the expected marker mutations inserted into the component clones.”

  7. On April 19, 2002 – the Spring before the first SARS outbreak in Asia – Christopher M. Curtis, Boyd Yount, and Ralph
    Baric filed an application for U.S. Patent 7,279,372 for a method of producing recombinant coronavirus. In the first
    public record of the claims, they sought to patent a means of producing, “an infectious, replication defective,
    coronavirus.” This work was supported by the NIH grant referenced above and GM63228. In short, the U.S. Department
    of Health and Human Services was involved in the funding of amplifying the infectious nature of coronavirus between
    1999 and 2002 before SARS was ever detected in humans.

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