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C. Oregon jobless rates fall in September; hiring tops seasonal norms, economist says

Oregon Employment Dept.

But unemployment numbers are still higher than from before pandemic

BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) -- Unemployment rates dropped significantly across Central Oregon in September and monthly hiring exceeded seasonal expectations, Oregon Employment Department Regional Economist Damon Runberg reported Tuesday.

Here's his full monthly report.

Crook County: The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 6.5% in September, another significant decline from 6.8% in August. The unemployment rate remains around 2 percentage points higher than before the first impacts from COVID-19 in February 2020, when it was 4.4%.

Crook County lost 20 jobs in September. The region typically sees little change to the employment situation in September. Seasonally adjusted total nonfarm employment in September was roughly 1.5% (+100 jobs) above the pre-COVID peak in February 2020.

The monthly job losses in September were concentrated in professional and business services, leisure and hospitality, and federal government. Seasonal losses are typical in these sectors at the end of summer. Inversely, the monthly gains in local government and private education are typical from back-to-school hiring.

Deschutes County (Bend-Redmond MSA): The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped to 5.1% in September, down from 5.4% in August. The unemployment rate remains higher than before the first impacts from COVID-19 in February 2020, when it was 3.3%.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that Deschutes County added 800 jobs in September, stronger gains than typical for this time of year. According to these estimates, total nonfarm employment remains down by 3,240 jobs from the pre-COVID peak (-3.6%). Revisions to recent Bend-Redmond MSA data will be released next month.

A handful of industries posted significant job gains over the past year, including financial activities (+480); education and health services (+400); manufacturing (+380); other services (+370); and construction (+160). The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that both retail trade (-210) and leisure and hospitality (-110) lost jobs from last September.

Jefferson County: The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 6.1% in September, down from 6.3% in August. The unemployment rate remains higher than before the first impacts from COVID-19 in February 2020, when it was 4.1%.

Total nonfarm employment rose by 50 jobs in September, slower growth than typical this time of year. As of September, employment levels remain down only 1.9% (-130 jobs) from the pre-COVID peak in February 2020.

Construction remains the fastest-growing major industry sector over the past year, adding 30 jobs (+21.4%). The retail sector (+60 jobs) and manufacturing (+50 jobs) also posted strong gains from this time last year. There were also significant employment gains in local government over the past year with local education and Indian tribal both hiring.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the October county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, Nov. 23 and the statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for October on Tuesday, Nov. 16.

KTVZ news sources

Comments

9 Comments

    1. The amount of deaths should never have happened if cheeto head had done his job. Things would never have gotten so bad if the other guy had been honest with the American people from the beginning. Btw, never take advice from someone that wears magical underwear.

      1. I remember bullies making fun of people and calling them names like this. What we learned is it was personal hurt that caused them to lash out at others and be bullies. Without top role model parents, it seems that the kids became bullies and ended up living a life full of anger and drug abuse.

        On a side note, Mongo was my nickname back in HS football. Its fun to see it again when I enter the KTVZ chats and see your posts. Thanks for the flashbacks!

  1. These numbers do not seem to reflect the hundreds of hospital workers- teachers- police- or any others who have lost their jobs due to the mandates- why is that ? We know for a fact that St Charles alone lost hundreds… Damon needs to explain his fuzzy math.

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