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Oregon reports 48 more COVID-19 deaths, 1,562 new cases

COVID-19 generic MGN
MGN

(Update: Adding OHA update on vaccine doses in hand and expected)

Second day of surge tied to processing of death reports, OHA says; weekly report shows fewer cases, deaths, hospitalizations

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — COVID-19 has claimed 48 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,262, along with 1,562 new cases, the Oregon Health Authority reported Wednesday.

OHA reported 1,562 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, bringing the state total to 97,622 cases.

This daily media release also includes an update on the COVID-19 Weekly Report and the Weekly Outbreak Report, along with a daily update on COVID-19 hospitalizations.

Wednesday's death reporting, coupled with Tuesday’s, represents the highest two-day death COVID-19-associated death toll since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon.

Each death is a sad reminder of the danger posed by the virus and of the need – even with vaccine now becoming available – for Oregonians to continue taking the steps to stem the spread of the virus by doing the following:

  • Maintain 6 feet of physical distance.
  • Wear a face covering when outside the house.
  • Practice good hand hygiene.
  • Avoid gatherings with non-household members.
  • If you have symptoms, consult with a medical provider quickly to get instructions on how to care for yourself and your household members and whether to get tested.

The surge in reported deaths is the result of steadily high daily case counts and the manner of processing death reports, the agency said.

The counting of deaths from death certificates may take additional time to process because they are determined by physicians and then sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for further review and confirmation. The information is then reported back to states.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 554, which is 10 more than yesterday. There are 113 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

St. Charles Health System reported 39 COVID-19 patients as of 7 a.m. Wednesday, three of whom were in the ICU, one on a ventilator.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Weekly report shows decline in daily cases

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows a drop in weekly cases, deaths and people hospitalized for COVID-19.

OHA reported 9,222 new daily cases during the week of Monday, Dec. 7 through Sunday, Dec. 13, an 11% decrease from the previous week, reversing a trend of seven consecutive record high weekly case counts.

There were 491 people hospitalized for COVID-19, a slight decline from the previous week.

There were 116 reported COVID-19 reported deaths, down from 133 the previous week.

People age 20 to 49 have accounted for 55% of the cases, while people 70 and older have accounted for 76% of the deaths.

There were fewer tests for COVID-19 reported for the week of Dec. 6 through Dec. 12. The number of COVID-19 tests administered to Oregonians dropped to 149,243 from 170,964 the previous week. The percentage of positive tests was lower, at 7.4%.

The OHA Outbreak Report publishes data on COVID-19 cases and deaths in care facilities; senior living facilities and congregate care settings and on active and resolved COVID-19 outbreaks.

Cases and deaths

The new cases reported Wednesday are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (31), Clackamas (166), Clatsop (7), Columbia (5), Coos (11), Crook (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (50), Douglas (16), Gilliam (2), Harney (4), Hood River (16), Jackson (64), Jefferson (29), Josephine (29), Klamath (20), Lake (2), Lane (105), Lincoln (5), Linn (51), Malheur (16), Marion (183), Morrow (8), Multnomah (455), Polk (30), Sherman (2), Tillamook (12), Umatilla (34), Union (9), Wallowa (1), Wasco (4), Washington (148) and Yamhill (33).

Note: In its daily media release Tuesday, Dec. 15, OHA omitted information on the Oregon’s 1,198th COVID-19 death, a 56-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died Nov. 27 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,215th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 3 and died Dec. 15 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,216th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Clackamas County who died Aug. 9 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,217th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 6 and died Dec. 9 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,218th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 11 and died Dec. 13. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,219th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Clackamas County who died May 24 at Providence Portland Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,220th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Clatsop County who tested positive on Nov. 2 and died at SW Washington Medical Center in Vancouver. Date of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,221st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Benton County who died Nov. 25 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,222nd COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old man in Columbia County who tested positive on Dec. 11 and died Dec. 12 at St. John Medical Center in Longview, Wash. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,223rd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 15 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,224th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Jackson County who tested died Aug. 4 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,225th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Josephine County who tested positive on Dec. 3 and died Dec. 14. Location of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,226th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Lane County who died Aug. 21 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,227th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 29 and died Dec. 6 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,228th COVID-19 death is a 30-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 26 and died Nov. 30 at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,229th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Nov. 23 and died Dec. 9 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,230th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died Dec. 8. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,231st COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 29 and died Dec. 6 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,232nd COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old woman in Marion County who died May 30 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,233rd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County who died Aug. 7 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,234th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Multnomah County who died Oct. 29 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,235th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Multnomah County who died Oct. 29 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,236th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Multnomah County who died Oct. 31 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,237th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died Nov. 24. Location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,238th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 21 and died Oct. 20. Location of death is being confirmed. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,239th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov.10 and died Nov. 19 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,240th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died Dec. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,241st COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died Dec. 9 at Adventist Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,242nd COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died Dec. 1. Location of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,243rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 11 and died Dec. 15 at Adventist Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,244th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 27 and died Dec. 10 at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,245th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Washington County who died Dec. 9 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,246th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 10 and died Dec. 12, at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,247th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 4 and died Dec. 9 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,248th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 4 and died Dec. 13 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,249th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 23 and died Dec. 15 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,250th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died Dec. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,251st COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 30 and died Dec.13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,252nd COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 9 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,253rd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,254th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died Dec. 12 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,255th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 7 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,256th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 13 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,257th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,258th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 10 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,259th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on April 16 and died June 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death.

Oregon’s 1,260th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Dec. 15 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,261st COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Washington County who died Dec. 2 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,262nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 8 and died Dec. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Mental and emotional resources for difficult times:

  • Mental and emotional health resources are available on OHA’s Safe + Strong website.
  • Or call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 800-923-4357 (800-923-HELP). The line offers free, 24-7 emotional support and resource referral to anyone who needs it – not only those experiencing a mental health crisis.
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State’s first COVID-19 vaccines given to health care workers

More than 35,000 doses expected in Oregon before week’s end; Director Allen clarifies remarks

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 immunizations with the new Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine began today in Oregon, kicking off a statewide effort that could see thousands of health care workers getting first doses by week’s end.

The state is expected to receive 35,100 doses this week, according to the Oregon Health Authority Immunization Program, citing federal allocation estimates. The first shipments from that batch arrived Monday and Tuesday, when four health systems — Legacy Health, Oregon Health & Science University and Kaiser Permanente and Saint Alphonsus — received a total of 4,875 doses.

Hospital staff at OHSU, Saint Alphonsus Medical Center in Ontario, and at Legacy Health’s Holladay Park and Meridian Park sites started getting vaccinated today; Kaiser expects to begin its vaccinations on Friday.

Of this week’s federal vaccine allotment, 10,725 doses are being sent to pharmacies serving skilled nursing facilities as part of a federal partnership with CVS, Walgreens and Consonus Healthcare to offer on-site, no-cost COVID-19 vaccines to staff and residents of more than 680 long term care facilities in Oregon. Their vaccinations are set to begin sometime next week, and will begin with skilled nursing facilities, but eventually will be used to vaccinate in a variety of congregate care settings, including a handful of facilities caring for residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

In all, between 300,000 and 400,000 health care workers, and long-term care facility staff and residents in Oregon are slated for vaccination against COVID-19 during the first phase of the state’s vaccination distribution effort.

The remaining 19,500 doses from this week’s batch will be distributed to health facilities around the state over the next several days.

More Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine deliveries are scheduled the weeks of Dec. 20 and Dec. 27, when allocations of 25,350 and 48,750, respectively, are expected to arrive in Oregon.

The allocation of 25,350 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech now scheduled to arrive in Oregon the week of Dec. 20 is a reduction from the original amount of 40,950 Oregon was previously scheduled to have allocated during that week. Federal officials notified the state about the change today.

A COVID-19 vaccine made by Moderna Inc., which is expected to receive FDA emergency use authorization within days, also are scheduled for delivery in the state before the end of the month — 71,900 doses the week of Dec. 20 and 31,700 doses the week of Dec. 27. These allocation numbers are provided to states by the CDC for planning purposes, but are subject to change.

If estimated allocations for Oregon are received, state health officials expect health systems will have a sufficient amount of vaccine to provide first doses to more than 100,000 health care workers and long term care facility residents by the end of the month.

Speaking during a news conference with Gov. Kate Brown and representatives from the health facilities that received vaccine deliveries this week, OHA Director Patrick Allen said: “On Feb. 28, 2020 — 292 days ago — the world changed for all of us. That was the day the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in Oregon,” Allen said. “Today the world has changed again. Today we’ve seen the first COVID-19 vaccinations in Oregon. I want every Oregonian to know: COVID-19 vaccination is the safest, most effective and most reliable way to keep yourself, your family and your community healthy and safe from COVID-19.”

Director Allen also clarified his comments at the news conference: “Earlier today, I was imprecise in describing the number of doses currently on the ground in Oregon. I’m also afraid my comments about the speed at which health care workers would receive second doses was confusing. I take responsibility for my inaccuracy. As we move forward, it’s vital that the Oregon Health Authority is fully transparent, accurate, reliable and consistent in all aspects of our vaccination program, especially our data. I pledge that I will do better.”

News / Oregon-Northwest / Top Stories

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Comments

12 Comments

    1. And about a quarter of those that died appear to be of working age and of direct benefit to society (even including you, Epi). And of the rest, perhaps they were working too or otherwise contributing. Ever think that the elderly can be of value to the family, community, or society? Judging from your comments here and previous, you don’t seem to grasp what really distinguishes the human race from other species. Maybe when and if you ever reach 65 or so we can just consider you expendable too.

      1. They’re dying WITH covid, not OF covid. Mortality rates are the same as all-cause mortality.

        What OHA officially considers a covid death:

        Deaths in which a patient hospitalized for any reason within 14 days of a positive covid-19 test dies in the hospital or within 60 days of discharge.

        Positive covid test + suicide by shotgun within 60 days of discharge from hospital = covid death

        https://youtu.be/QRdAiL-YJfs?t=78

    2. Would you unpack what that means to you? Life expectancy for someone who lives to 78 is, overall, about another decade. I may be misunderstanding, but my impression is that you’re suggesting it’s essentially of no significance for people who otherwise would have continued to live to die if they’ve already made it to the average lifespan an American can expect at birth.

      1. No, you are misunderstanding.

        People are dying WITH covid. Covid is not killing them. The age rate of covid mortality is the same as all-cause mortality…meaning people are dying when they would normally die, they just also happen to test positive for covid and our government officials call that a covid death.

        Read VERY slowly 10 times and try to comprehend. The video link is from KGW8 in Portland – an nbc affiliate and very credible….Everyone is blindly ignoring all of the data or they simply can’t comprehend it:

        What OHA officially considers a covid death:

        Deaths in which a patient hospitalized for any reason within 14 days of a positive covid-19 test dies in the hospital or within 60 days of discharge.

        Positive covid test + suicide by shotgun within 60 days of discharge from hospital = covid death

        https://youtu.be/QRdAiL-YJfs?t=78

        1. I understand and agree that a death with COVID doesn’t necessarily indicate a death from COVID. What I’m trying to understand is how your reference to the average age of the reported deaths yesterday ties into your illogical inference that only deaths that occur in the absence of any other contributing factors should be viewed as deaths from COVID. Believing that someone who dies in an auto accident while positive with COVID shouldn’t be counted as a “COVID death,” for example, doesn’t mean dismissing the significance of COVID as a cause of death in a person who happens to have some other condition. Physicians should (and should be able to) use appropriate professional judgment in assigning causes of death, but my impression from conversations with physicians who have made several such determinations is that the “stretch” cases are rarities.

        2. Seems to me you’re arguing about something meaningless. What’s the point of distinguishing how many of over 300K Americans died “with” Covid or “from” Covid? A preposition makes no difference – dead is dead. Grief and loss aren’t mitigated in any way by your irrelevant debate. Why not find something more important to fight for, something that can improve a situation rather than just being argumentative.

        3. People are dying prematurely. Just because they are above your assigned age threshold or have a health condition, does not make them expendable. Maybe try considering others outside of your bubble.

        4. Using your logic, a person will die from organ failure, not the cancer that caused organ failure. Or, a person in a coma dies form organ failure, not the car accident that caused the coma. People that die from influenza often die of pneumonia or organ failure etc. So you are essentially saying that when the 75 year old that may easily live another 10 years gets COVID and then dies, they would have died anyway so we shouldn’t try to prevent them from getting COVID.

  1. Dear Mr./Mrs. Epsteindidntkillhimself: I appreciate the arguments that you present. But why do you feel compelled to be such an ass? Do you speak to your friends and family in this rude manor? It is fine to present the ideas that you support. Does it make you feel better to “LMAO at rubes”? Is this your lone contribution to society? Name calling, belittling people all for the sake of what exactly? It certainly does not help to get you ideas across to other people. Be a adult.

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