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Brown issues order targeting hotel price-gouging reports amid winter storm

Gov. Kate Brown
KTVZ file
Gov. Kate Brown
SALEM, Ore. (KTVZ) Gov. OR) — Gov. Kate Brown on Tuesday issued Executive Order 21-03, declaring an abnormal market disruption as a result of the severe winter weather emergency in nine Oregon counties. The order is in response to reports of unusual increases in lodging rates for Oregonians who have sought temporary stays until power can be restored at their homes.  

“During a time when so many Oregonians have been without power for days, it is absolutely unacceptable to price gouge those who are seeking a warm, safe place to stay until power is back on in their homes,” Brown said. "This order empowers the attorney general and the Oregon Department of Justice to investigate these instances and take appropriate action if businesses are found to be in violation.”

“We appreciate Oregon’s lodging businesses that have provided warmth and shelter to families without power due to the President’s Day weekend storm that hit much of the state," said Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum. "However, price gouging is illegal. Please consider this a clear message to businesses that you may not raise the price of lodging, or any other goods or services, due to increased demand from this storm. If anyone feels they have been the victim of price gouging, please contact our Consumer Protection Hotline right away.” 

Oregonians who believe they have been subjected to excessive prices for lodging or essential consumer goods and services due to this disruption can report these instances to the Oregon Department of Justice through their Consumer Protection Hotline at 877-877-9392. Oregonians can also visit www.OregonConsumer.gov for more information. The Oregon Department of Justice has the authority to investigate unlawful trade practices.

This Executive Order is in addition to, and does not replace, Executive Order 20-15 or Executive Order 20-57, which declared an abnormal market disruption due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the Labor Day wildfires, respectively. These orders remain in effect.
Government-politics / News / Oregon-Northwest

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Comments

7 Comments

  1. Let’s see; it was a three day weekend, so usage was up; it was also St. Valentine’s weekend, so stay-cations were in demand, so use was up, and it was a weekend full of snow, so families went to places to play for the weekend and usage was up. Good luck trying to prove price gouging. BTW, the Oregon Dept. of Forestry declared the fire season on July 5, 2020, but the Governor did not release an executive order on price gouging protections until September 10, 2020. One has to wonder if the time delay in the wildfire order has to do with those areas most impacted are the more conservative areas of the state as opposed to the liberal areas of the state impacted by a small bit of ice and snow…and how many cases of price gouging were proven during that last executive order?

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