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Oregon reports 22 more COVID-19 related deaths, including Deschutes County’s 100th; 2,099 new cases

Deschutes County COVID-19 dashboard showed 100 deaths Friday
Deschutes County
Deschutes County COVID-19 dashboard showed 100 deaths Friday

But latest modeling projects drop in daily cases, hospitalizations

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) -- There are 22 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, including the 100th death of a Deschutes County resident, raising the state’s death toll to 3,569, the Oregon Health Authority reported Friday.

OHA also reported 2,099 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Friday, bringing the state total to 309,841.

Asked for reaction to the 100th death, Deschutes County Commissioner Phil Chang noted that "25 of those 100 deaths occurred in just the last two months of the pandemic.

"The Delta variant is raging through our community, and particularly the unvaccinated. We need everyone in Deschutes County to do their part to prevent additional deaths of our neighbors. Please wear masks, limit social gatherings, and get vaccinated so we can get this pandemic under control. Your friends, family members and neighbors are depending on you to protect them and to help get our lives back to normal. "  

Newest COVID-19 modeling report projects decrease in daily cases and hospitalizations

OHA also released Friday its latest COVID-19 forecast, showing a projected decline in daily cases and hospitalizations through late September.

According to the report, the effective reproduction rate — the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates — was estimated at .79 on Sept. 1, projecting a decline in the estimated growth of new cases and hospitalizations over last week’s modeling scenario.

At that level of transmission, the report estimates 280 cases per 100,000 people, or an average of 830 daily cases and 41 hospitalizations for the two-week period between Sept. 22 and Oct. 5.

The modeling report labeled that projection “optimistic,” as it was based on the lowest point of transmission.

The report proposed an alternative scenario, factoring in assumptions around the impacts of reopening schools and many public events scheduled during the next month. In that scenario, new cases are estimated at 350 per 100,000 people or an average of 1,060 daily cases and 51 hospitalizations over the same period.

Vaccinations remain the most effective tool for slowing the spread of COVID-19, OHA said, adding that Oregonians should wear masks when in indoor public spaces and when outdoors among crowds.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,002, which is 25 fewer than Thursday. There are 287 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than Thursday.

There are 58 available adult ICU beds out of 658 total (9% availability) and 369 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,246 (9% availability).

9/17/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)
 StatewideRegion 1Region 2Region 3Region 5Region 6Region 7Region 9
Adult ICU beds available58(9%)22(6%)5(5%)19(40%)4(7%)0(0%)1(2%)7(28%)
Adult non-ICU beds available369(9%)70(4%)15(2%)137(22%)36(8%)9(18%)45(12%)57(44%)

St. Charles Bend reported 90 COVID-19 patients early Friday, 15 of whom were in the ICU, with 13 on ventilators. One of the 15 ICU patients was fully vaccinated and 14 of the 90 patients were fully vaccinated.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA reported Friday that 8,696 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Thursday. Of this total, 3,979 were administered Thursday: 1,874 were initial doses, 1,697 were second doses and 358 were third doses. The remaining 4,717 were administered on previous days, but were entered into the vaccine registry on Thursday.

The seven-day running average is now 8,535 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,905,173 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,882,388 doses of Moderna and 209,164 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of Friday, 2,698,924 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,458,176 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated Friday.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Friday are in the following counties: Baker (28), Benton (25), Clackamas (252), Clatsop (12), Columbia (22), Coos (40), Crook (17), Curry (2), Deschutes (128), Douglas (59), Gilliam (3), Harney (11), Hood River (12), Jackson (115), Jefferson (14), Josephine (48), Klamath (59), Lake (12), Lane (176), Lincoln (25), Linn (128), Malheur (36), Marion (157), Morrow (3), Multnomah (218), Polk (57), Sherman (2), Tillamook (16), Umatilla (63), Union (8), Wallowa (7), Wasco (29), Washington (188) and Yamhill (127).

Oregon’s 3,548th COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old woman from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 5 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,549th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 22 and died on Aug. 31 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,550th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,551st COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 16 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,552nd COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Sept. 15 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,553rd COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 12 and died on Aug. 19 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,554th COVID-19 related death is a 55-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 4 and died on Aug. 24 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,555th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Harney County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 16 at his residence. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,556th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old woman from Harney County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Aug. 28 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,557th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 13 and died on Sept. 15 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,558th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,559th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,560th death is a 95-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 19 and died on Sept. 6 at his residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,561st COVID-19 related death is a 43-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 16 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,562nd COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Sept. 15 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,563rd COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old woman from Polk County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 14 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3564th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 14 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,565th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,566th COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 16 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,567th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Sept. 16 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,568th COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old man from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 10 at CHI St. Anthony Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,569th COVID-19 related death is a 93-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 14 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Updated information is known about Oregon’s 3,497th death: a 36-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Sept. 12 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

KTVZ news sources

Comments

45 Comments

  1. Just yesterday I read that in pre-Covid times, the average ICU population in any given hospital in the United States is 85% to 90% capacity and more like 95% in the UK. This is for economic efficiency. It makes total sense. If this is true, then all the “nearly at capacity” panic we read every day is pure propaganda. How about a little investigative reporting KTVZ? I’d love to know what percentage of capacity St. Charles ICU ran at over the last ten years.

    1. Well Mr HH, we need to get rid of about 600 St. Charles staff that refuses to be hammered into submitting into getting the unproven vaccination, while we are already understaffed to the point of very unsafe staffing with most units having more travel nurses than normal staff, only to bring in hundreds of more travel nurses that have no clue how our hospital runs or any of it’s protocols only to make it safer by getting rid of those hundreds of healthcare employees. Many who have been there for decades and were safe to care for the community up until Oct 18.

      1. No one is hammering. It’s a condition of employment. Regardless of how you feel about it. Just like hep B vaccine. Condition of employment. No one is forcing you to work. Good luck finding a job.

        1. After a year and a half- it now becomes “a condition of employment” ??? The science has been clear for decades- the best place to get sick- is at a pharmacy- a clinic- or a hospital ! Kate Brown has failed the state- specific mandates for health care workers should have kicked in immediately after the outbreak in Washington !

      2. Just looking for an excuse to be right about something. Earlier this week we had 100 plus covid patents. 15 in the ICU. That’s over half of the ICU filled with covid patients. Over half! Does that not bring it home for you? Those are beds for patients that need urgent ICU level of care surgeries. Patients that can’t be discharged are being housed in areas not meant for in patient care. Do you get any of this?

    2. I said this EXACT same thing awhile ago about hospitals operating near capacity for financial operations. Hospitals are currently operating a little higher than normal though, HOWEVER, at least in the case of St Charles, it’s more due to lack of staff than covid.

  2. For those of you wondering- like me- finally… an explanation from the OHA as to how they “define” an Oregon Covid Death… here is the first sentence: “In Oregon a death is reported as a COVID death if:
    “The death is of a confirmed or probable COVID-19 case within 60 days of the earliest available date among exposure to a confirmed case, onset of symptoms, or date of specimen collection for the first positive test”… Read that again… “probable” ??? Since when is the term “probably” based on scientific fact ? There it is- your Oregon hoax !

    1. To go step further… just ask yourself- is this appropriate ? Excuse me Doctor B… Does my wife have cancer ? “Yeh- probably” ! WTH ??? No doctor on the planet would respond in this manner- yet the OHA under the direction of Governor Kate Brown- has been doing this for over a year and a half !

    2. People are actually dying of covid yet you keep puking up misinformation. Hospitals in Idaho are currently having to use military triage. Yet you keep calling this a hoax. Tell that to the families that have family members unable to get life saving care. It’s really incredible that you spend so much energy trying to debunk something that is real. I work in it every day. Yet you and people like Oregone want to pout and stomp your feet that we are not in a crisis. Grow up

            1. “twist the data” is clearly subjective… that cup is either half full or half empty- depending on your outlook. Isn’t that what a comments section is for-opinions “based” on personal insight ? We’ve had this back and forth over the VAERS data- you find it unreliable- I say it’s an excellent barometer to serious concerns… I’ve said it before- I have no problem with your opinion on that.

              1. I have not said I find it unreliable. You claim I state opinions, when what I do is accurately quote the CDC, which gathers the data and warns against its misuse as anything but an UNcorroborated, unconfirmed data submission.

        1. Still not sure why you are allowed to “twist” comments without being challenged- but I will… “nobody” has said the virus is a hoax… the response to the plandemic though- absolutely ! The data don’t don’t lie- this is a mild virus- where numbers are inflated because testing does not differentiate between the common flu- the sniffles- or the Wuhan Bat. You could have been exposed- recovered- die 6 weeks later from a heart attack- your death cert will say “death related to covid” ! The “hoax” produced Joey Biden- who has made matters and death counts worse than anything we could have imagined… There ya go untwisted- and straight from the horses mouth.

        1. Well below the seasonal flu numbers- and we never destroyed our economy- civil liberties or constitutional rights over that. This is not a crisis- not even a pandemic- it’s a mild virus which can attack those with underlying conditions like asthma- copd- heart disease… the same people that would struggle under a hard flu outbreak.

            1. The current tests being administered do not (and have never) been able to differentiate between the seasonal flu or the covid corona variant. My position stands… mild virus- 99% survival in the majority of age categories- absolutely no reason to destroy the nations constitution over.

              1. “A PCR test is an excellent identifier of COVID-19 cases, because of something called specificity. Basically, specificity means that the test is designed to only detect one type of virus. Dr. Broadhurst says, “The PCR test is validated against many different coronaviruses and common respiratory viruses, including influenza so that it would not give false-positive results.” Meaning, researchers subjected the test to many different samples to see if it would give the wrong result. It correctly identified SARS-CoV-2 out of all of these samples.”
                https://www.nebraskamed.com/COVID/pcr-test-recall-can-the-test-tell-the-difference-between-covid-19-and-the-flu

    3. Yep. It’s actually been that way from the beginning and has been talked about before on here. Someone can die from something completely unrelated to covid and still be counted as a covid death if they happened to test positive. Hell, because it’s 60 days, they could have tested positive, recovered from it, then dies from something completely unrelated and be counted as a covid death.

    1. this is fascinating info! And this statement from the OHA is all I need to read!

      Reporting COVID Deaths
      “The death results from any cause in a hospitalized person during admission or in the 60 days following discharge AND a COVID-19-positive laboratory diagnostic test at any time since14 days prior to hospitalization”

      That means I could of had a posive test for covid recovered and felt fine, get hit by a car and die on the operating table and guess what? My cause of death will be reported as COVID!

    2. BGHW ~ if you hate it so much here why do you stick around?

      I’m guessing there are several states that would welcome a **** soul such as yourself.

      To your good health. Happy trails!

      1. Small example of moderator judgment calls – what if most of a post isn’t a personal attack, do I edit/allow it?
        I really don’t have time/inclination to do that much. Some very good posts have not been allowed because they also included a single personal attack.
        But editing lots of comments would be time-consuming and is not my role.
        So please, stick to debating the issue, and try not to sink to the level some trolls seem to dwell in. (Note I name no names…. others can fill in the blanks quite easily, thus avoiding a TOS violation.)
        Thank you.

        1. Once again- this is a pretty obvious personal attack- yet it is allowed to stay…. “there are several states that would welcome a **** soul such as yourself.” ??? The rest of that post has nothing to do with the topic- so why not remove it ?

          1. Because it wasn’t an attack but urging you to find a place more to your liking. Off-topic will NEVER be a factor in consideration here. Feel free to find some place where you can set the rules to your whims.
            You attack me all the time and still expect all of those to show. As you’ve learned, they won’t. I have deleted MANY people attacking you for the things you post here.
            And no, I don’t have to prove it.

            1. Perfect reply, Barney…it gave me a laugh.
              My long-time friend, with different opinions than mine, died 2 weeks ago at St Charles in Bend, from COVID. The only pre-existing condition I can think of is, she was a very heavy smoker for years, but she had quit over 3 years ago.
              She was an anti-masker, anti-vaxxer, and COVID denier.
              It breaks my heart, but it’s getting harder and harder to have sympathy for them.

              1. One has to wonder… why has St Charles shut down elective surgeries for months on end- yet dentists continue their work undisturbed. Can we get a reporter out there to talk to a dentist as to why they perform “oral surgeries”- yet someone’s Grams can’t get a hip replacement !

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