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Oregon reports 17 more COVID-19 related deaths, 1 from C.O., 19,400 cases over past 3 days

Oregon Health Authority

(Update: Adding details of newly reported deaths)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — There are 17 newly reported COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon over the past three days, including one in Deschutes County, raising the state’s death toll to 5,953, the Oregon Health Authority reported Monday.

OHA also reported 19,400 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 in the three-day period, bringing the state total to 590,270.

The 17 new deaths and 19,400 new cases reported Monday include data recorded by counties for the three-day period between Friday, Jan. 21 and Sunday, Jan. 23.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 451,268 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of Monday, Oregon needs 548,732 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,045, which is 19 more than Sunday. There are 161 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than Sunday.

There are 48 available adult ICU beds out of 643 total (7% availability) and 243 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,096 (6% availability).

1/24/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)
 StatewideRegion 1Region 2Region 3Region 5Region 6Region 7Region 9
Adult ICU beds available48(7%)19(6%)4(5%)6(7%)6(10%)1(10%)7(17%)5(19%)
Adult non-ICU beds available243(6%)71(4%)11(2%)28(5%)37(8%)9(18%)46(12%)41(34%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

St. Charles Bend reported 76 COVID-19-positive patients as of early Monday, seven of whom were in the ICU, four on ventilators. Six of the seven ICU patients were not fully vaccinated, the hospital said, while 48 of the 76 COVID patients were not fully vaccinated.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA reported Monday that 5,285 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sunday. Of that total, 352 were initial doses, 261 were second doses and 1,644 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 3,005 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Sunday.

The seven-day running average is now 12,159 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 4,003,118 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 202,343 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,632,405 doses of Moderna and 263,464 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of Monday, 3,112,692 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 2,814,714 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated Monday.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Monday (over the previous three days) are in the following counties: Baker (41), Benton (461), Clackamas (1,532), Clatsop (104), Columbia (165), Coos (204), Crook (200), Curry (64), Deschutes (1,402), Douglas (228), Gilliam (14), Grant (36), Harney (28), Hood River (64), Jackson (1,113), Jefferson (105), Josephine (343), Klamath (448), Lake (4), Lane (2,048), Lincoln (213), Linn (834), Malheur (188), Marion (1,940), Morrow (71), Multnomah (2,940), Polk (425), Sherman (37), Tillamook (66), Umatilla (541), Union (125), Wallowa (28), Wasco (209), Washington (2,722) and Yamhill (457).

Oregon reported 4,922 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Friday, Jan. 21, 10,862 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Saturday, Jan. 22 and 3,616 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sunday, Jan. 23.

Oregon’s 5,937th COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 7, 2021, and died Dec. 9, 2021, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,938th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive Nov. 24, 2021, and died Dec. 9, 2021, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,939th COVID-19-related death is a 54-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Nov. 23, 2021, and died Dec. 9, 2021, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,940th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 29, 2021, and died Dec. 6, 2021, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,941st COVID-19-related death is a 77-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Nov. 4, 2021, and died Dec. 2, 2021, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,942nd COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old man from Hood River County who tested positive Jan. 14 and died Jan. 21 at Providence Hood River Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,943rd COVID-19-related death is a 61-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Dec. 30, 2021, and died Jan. 20 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,944th COVID-19-related death is a 67-year-old woman from Deschutes County who died Dec. 6, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,945th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 20 and died Jan. 20 at Providence Willamette Falls Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,946th COVID-19-related death is a 37-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 8, 2021, and died Nov. 30, 2021, at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,947th COVID-19-related death is a 77-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Jan. 12 and died Jan. 21 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,948th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive Jan. 12 and died Jan. 16 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,949th COVID-19-related death is a 62-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 15 and died Jan. 15 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,950th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 18 and died Jan. 18 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,951st COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 14 and died Jan. 22 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,952nd COVID-19-related death is a 50-year-old woman from Washington County who died Jan. 16 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,953rd COVID-19-related death is a 63-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Jan. 13 and died Jan. 21 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit OHA's web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

KTVZ news sources

Comments

24 Comments

  1. Wow. Look at that. Highly vaxxed Deschutes county has far more cases than lesser vaxxed Jackson County. Both have about the same population size–Deschutes at 209k and Jackson at 224k.

    Gotta wonder what’s going on.

    1. Cases are only a small part of the story. Hospitalization and even more importantly ICU patients are now the key factors. St Charles has 76 patients with 7 in the ICU, in contrast Asante Hospital in Medford has 92 patients with 20 in the ICU.

      1. Age and health demographic is likely a big factor. I don’t know much about Jackson, but Deschutes has a very young median age, and generally follows a healthier lifestyle than other counties. Age and comorbidities are the primary drivers of covid complications. And due to reporting overlap, the best way to get a feel for hospitalizations is to look at the 7-day average wich for Jackson county currently stands at 53 patients with 10 in ICU. 7-day average for Deschutes is 43 and 4. Jackson is 57% vaccinated. Deschutes is 67%. Not sure how to do the math there.

  2. I did the shots because I am around a lot of people who believe they can trust me and that I would do all I could possibly do to protect them. I think also, that I would rather die trying. If I ended up on a respirator and didn’t vax, I would feel like an idiot. I watched my Dad die on that thing. Not saying I know everything. Just doing me. You should have the right to do you. I’m okay with you either way.

    1. I agree. Its called Covid roulette. Feel free to play. I’ll pass. I have self preservation and am NOT self destructive. So, better safe than sorry.

    2. I hear people telling others they need to wear a mask even when vaccinated because the vaccine doesn’t stop infection or transmission, and with that same mouth tell other people they are not safe to be around because they are not vaccinated even though they do wear a mask, all the while they themselves are both masked and vaccinated. And then they actually get the disease they have been fearing for two years, discover it’s a mild cold for a couple of days, recover and are still afraid of catching the virus!

  3. Ivermectin is a drug approved for human use. It is not a horse dewormer. While not approved specifically by the FDA for use as a therapeutic for Covid it has been approved in over 100 countries and like 3 other therapeutics not approved specifically by the FDA for Covid, Drs. at ST Charles will prescribe if asked and the script can be filled at Central Oregon Pharmacy. These are verified facts, not word salad meant to impress my new batch of twenty something co-workers!

      1. Your own reference from the FDA says ANIMAL FORMULATIONS are not safe! Are you claiming that the Ivermectin being prescribed by Drs at St Charles and administered by local pharmacies to Human beings is an Animal Formulation? Wow! that is pretty salacious stuff!

  4. Since this is a local, ongoing story (reported from St Charles on our local numbers), it would be great to see a journalist ask:

    How many patients are in the ICU/regular beds/on vents admitted with Covid-19 as their chief complaint vs testing positive while being in the hospital for something completely unrelated?

    In early January, the NY Governor Kathy Hochul dug in and found out that about 40-50% of Covid-19 patients in the hospitals were actually admitted for something else, and tested positive once admitted. https://www.newsweek.com/42-new-yorks-hospitalized-covid-patients-admitted-other-reasons-1667220

    I think this is an important distinction that the hospitals need to be transparent about.

  5. Stop reporting already it’s the flu on steroids and nobody cares. I had it my whole family had it 6 of us we got over it went back to school and work and nobody gave me money and everyone is alive. Enough already.

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