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Co. promotes tests to curb potential date-rape drugs

Offers new, easy way to test drinks

BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) -- After two women said they believed they were drugged at a downtown Bend bar, one company reached out Thursday to NewsChannel 21 about a product anyone can use to test drinks to avoid, drug-facilitated sexual assaults. 

Undercover Colors offered to give one Bend woman free samples of its product after she reported of being drugged visiting a bar in downtown Bend.

Undercover Colors, a company founded by a North Carolina State University engineer who was a victim of drug-facilitated sexual assault, created the Sip Chip.

The Sip Chip's internal technology is similar to a pregnancy test: it allows consumers to place a drop of liquid on the chip, and 30 seconds later, lines appear indicating a safe beverage or one that has been drugged. 

The Sip Chip tests for date-rape drugs like Xanax, Rohypnol, Valium, benzodiazepines and many more. 

Nicolas Letourneau, the director of research and development for Undercover Colors, shared Thursday with NewsChannel 21 why this product is different from others on the market. 

"This product really stands behinds the accuracy of the test," Letournaeu said. "We treat this as a scientific, diagnostic tool. It is 99.3% accurate, which is by far the most accurate test on the market for date-rape drugs." 

Originally, the company concept began as a nail polish, but after consumer research, Undercover Colors realized it was not meeting the needs of the public, and was not gender neutral. 

The Sip Chip can fit in your pocket or on a key chain, and can even be attached to a cellphone case. 

Undercover Colors is working to bring the product to a number of college campuses across the nation. Students will be able to purchase individual packs of Sip Chips from their school, and potentially will be able to purchase them from vending machines as well. 

Sales and Marketing Director Suzie Bury said, "As you know, at least 1 in 14 college students have experienced some type of drugging within their four years at the university. That's a very strong target area, so we are talking to other people as well." 

Bend / Central Oregon / News / Top Stories

Arielle Brumfield

Arielle Brumfield is a multimedia journalist for NewsChannel 21. Learn more about Arielle here.

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